4 Ideas for Social Justice Educators

In the “Tips from Relando” section of Notes from an Aspiring Humanitarian, I share tips I have or lessons I’ve learned about working for diversity, inclusion, equity, and social justice.

I also share any resources that I come across that I feel can be helpful to others who wish to take up this work.

Today’s update features 4 Activity Ideas for Social Justice Educators. I hope you find them to be as useful as I have.

Need a Doorway Into Talking About Differences? Use Bath Towels

“While this can be a fun and light activity on the surface, it can also lead into deeper dialogue about how strongly we may feel about a certain way a towel should be folded can connect to how strongly we feel about the inclusion or exclusion of certain people or social groups.

This exercise can also have implications about being able to collaborate with others, and so much more. The possibilities are limited only by the imagination and willingness of the people involved.”


Talking About The Social Construction of Disability

“I continue to use it in my classes and workshops because of the way it encourages participants to think about their own lives, and gain a personal connection to, and an increased understanding of the ways the world is tailor-made for able-bodied people.”


Talking About Microaggressions

“The Powerpoint presentation contains quotes that were procured by myself and a friend from Microaggressions.com that I use to spark dialogue about microaggressions and themes of intent vs. impact as they relate to our interactions with others.

Especially useful when unpacking issues related to the social climate on college campuses, in work environments, communities, etc. Good for social justice educators, advocates, social workers, counselors, and other helpers.”


Deconstructing Meritocracy, Social Location, and Privilege

“I use this exercise near the beginning of each one of my classes to challenge the myth of meritocracy as it relates to socioeconomic status, and have also found that it can be used as a helpful lid opener to start dialogue on increasing awareness about other forms of privilege and oppression we may experience based on our social identities and their value in society.”

 

Ubuntu,

From Aspiring Humanitarian, Relando Thompkins-Jones, MSW, LLMSW

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